Tag Archive: ESL Teaching

Colombia: The Risk is Choosing the Slowest Line at the Grocery Store and other stories

Fifteen hypothetical chapters (blog posts?) that would star in a work of non-fiction about my (ahem, first) year in Colombia. What Were My High School Teachers Doing On Weekends? I’m 94% Sure This… Continue reading

Rate this:

About these ads

An Open Letter to My Students

My school year is rapidly coming to a close – simultaneously speeding and dragging towards November 16th. I’m trying to conclude chapters and concepts while the kids have thrown all discipline out the… Continue reading

Rate this:

Multiply this by 120.

Then look me in the eye and tell me your job is difficult.

Rate this:

The Day of the English, and the Pilgrims Hugged the Native Americans.

How do I even begin to describe English Day? I mean, adjectives are easy. Stressful. Chaotic. Loud. Confusing. Educational (?). Red. White. Blue. Cute. Hilarious. Exciting. Messy. Exhausting. Fun. That all describes my… Continue reading

Rate this:

Family Day.

Recently, in the midst of all 7 billion things I had going on the past two weeks, Gimnasio Moderno Santa Barbara dedicated a Sunday to school Family Day. Family Day was part fair,… Continue reading

Rate this:

Not that I’m counting…

Eight 90-minute classes to a weekend in Boyaca. Twelve more until Ecuador and Medellin. The lack of seasons in Bogotá/Tabio has me bugging out about the passing of time. Having spent 24 years… Continue reading

Rate this:

Dia del Profe

Riddle: How many times can one commemorative holiday be observed by a school of 200? Answer: Thus far, maxing out at three, with intentions of four. Colombia’s Día del Profesor (Teacher’s Day) was… Continue reading

Rate this:

THEY SPELLED MY NAME RIGHT ! ! !

A few weeks ago, my program director called and asked if I would be interested in getting interviewed by El Tiempo, Bogotás most prominent newspaper. But of course! They wanted to do a… Continue reading

Rate this:

Favorite Things.

It would be easy to sit here and whine about being isolated, teaching a million hours a week, I don’t have internet, the altitude hurts, living here is expensive, 14-year olds suck sometimes,… Continue reading

Rate this:

Just don’t ask me if I’m fluent.

I’m finally noticing that my Spanish is improving, at least to where it was when I left Ecuador which was definitely my peak of bilingualism (I think I was in Guate for too… Continue reading

Rate this: